Southern Hot Pepper Sauce

AuthorPepperHeadCategoryDifficultyBeginner

Pepper sauce is found on tables from home kitchens to the finest of dining establishments around the South, and no true Southern meal is really complete without it.

Yields1 Serving
Prep Time5 minsCook Time10 minsTotal Time15 mins

Ingredients

 Empty Bottles
 Hot Peppers (Tabasco or any other hot pepper)
 Apple Cider Vinegar

Directions

1

To achieve the same look as the recipe image, save up bourbon and whiskey bottles all year in preparation for pepper sauce making.

2

Wash them, and de-stemmed them. You will want latex gloves for this step. Just hold the pepper in one hand, and quickly twist off the stem with your other hand. They should pop right off.

3

Fill a clean bottle (of any kind) about half-way or 3/4 of the way full of peppers.

4

Meanwhile, bring a pot of white or apple cider vinegar (your choice – I used apple cider vinegar, 5% acidity) to a boil.

5

Once you have your bottles stuffed and the vinegar is boiling, pour the vinegar into the bottles over the peppers.

6

Fill to the top, and add a drop or two of olive oil.

7

These are shelf stable, and can even be “refilled” once or twice with more boiling vinegar and a couple more drops of olive oil.

Recipe by GhostRider

Ingredients

 Empty Bottles
 Hot Peppers (Tabasco or any other hot pepper)
 Apple Cider Vinegar

Directions

1

To achieve the same look as the recipe image, save up bourbon and whiskey bottles all year in preparation for pepper sauce making.

2

Wash them, and de-stemmed them. You will want latex gloves for this step. Just hold the pepper in one hand, and quickly twist off the stem with your other hand. They should pop right off.

3

Fill a clean bottle (of any kind) about half-way or 3/4 of the way full of peppers.

4

Meanwhile, bring a pot of white or apple cider vinegar (your choice – I used apple cider vinegar, 5% acidity) to a boil.

5

Once you have your bottles stuffed and the vinegar is boiling, pour the vinegar into the bottles over the peppers.

6

Fill to the top, and add a drop or two of olive oil.

7

These are shelf stable, and can even be “refilled” once or twice with more boiling vinegar and a couple more drops of olive oil.

Southern Hot Pepper Sauce
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34 thoughts on “Southern Hot Pepper Sauce

    • James says:

      Not tried this yet but love pepper sauce and vinegar
      Always trying some thing new for just the right taste
      Raise my own pepper s season various so taste does from year to year

      • tim says:

        Actually the oil being added at the end helps prevent corrosion of the lid; if you want to take the pepper sauce “hotter”, fry the chilies in a small amount of oil before adding the boiling vinegar. Look up Puerto Rican Pique recipe

      • Milford Weeks says:

        Actually the adding of a small amount of olive oil is both a Texas thing, and a european thing that works. Look up Texas Cowboy Candy. The olive oil breaks down the capsaicin quicker, and produces hotter sauce faster. And yes, hotter than it would be without. Especially if you use mixed peppers. I do several different pepper sauces: Straight Jalapeno, Jalapeno and Cayenne, Jalapeno and Banana, Habanero, and combinations of all of them. I sometimes add a clove of garlic, black peppercorns etc…

      • Gene says:

        Ethel, you sound like you have a lot of experience with making Pepper Sauce, maybe you can answer my question from above. Once the Pepper’s are in the container and the hot Vinegar has been added, how long is the wait before practical use?

    • Barbara says:

      its best to start a new batch because the peppers wont be pickled. However, when your bottle is near empty of vinegar just top it off with more vinegar. No need to heat the vinegar. The peppers will lose their potency over time.

  1. Donna says:

    I’m heating my glass containers with the peppers slowly. Just doesn’t seem right to pour boiling liquid into cool glass

  2. Judy says:

    I put peppers in a jar with a ounce of salt and vinegar, then refrigerated. Should I throw that bottle out and boil the vinegar in another batch.

  3. Pramila says:

    I boil 1: 1 vinegar and water. Cool it and then pour it on the peppers in the bottle. I also heat some oil , cool it and add it too Adding curry leaves and mustard and methi seeds to the hot oil gives it a nice flavour. This is optional. The oil works as a seal.Prevents mold.

  4. Gene says:

    I grow my own Chili’s and make my own Sauce, but, I am a Novice at it, only started a couple of years ago. My question for today, is how long does it take for the capsaisin to leak into the vinegar, in other words, how long before use can begin?

  5. Sandra Lopez says:

    I think I’ll do what you do. If bottles are not heat resistant, I’d be afraid they’d break with boiling vinegar. I also love your additions. Thank you

  6. Robert says:

    I put a small slit in each pepper. This is common practice with many recipes and seems to speed up the “magic”. Give it a day (maybe).

  7. Gene says:

    Something is killing my Chili and Hungarian pepper plants, I keep the insects killed of, but, they are still dying, it looks like the plant drys up, water does not seem to help it, anyone out there no what might be going on with them.

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